Want to shoot better footage? Edit your own work. Philip Bloom divulges how being his own editor made him a better filmmaker, and discusses the influence of the Canon 5D series

 

‘The days of people just knowing how to shoot and not knowing how to edit are long gone,’ Philip Bloom proclaims in the final part of our Close Up interview series. ‘You’d be considered a dinosaur if you don’t know how to edit.’

Philip’s words echo those of John Wright, whom we spoke to recently about the collapse of the divide between photographers and videographers.

For Philip though, editing isn’t just another string to add to the professional’s bow – it’s also a skill that can augment and improve one’s proficiency at shooting new footage. ‘Editing made my camera work ten times better, instantly,’ he says, as it was only when cutting his own footage that he was forced to acknowledge and confront the mistakes he was making.

In our interview, Philip also discuses the ongoing legacy of the DSLR video that began with the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. He was a slow adopter, having invested in a Nikon D90 (the actual first DSLR to shoot video, though not particularly well) in order to take advantage of his existing Nikon lens collection.

Once Philip got his hands on an EOS 5D Mark II, however, he was won over and found himself adopting it for commercial and corporate work before the film industry at large cottoned on to its potential.

The result of the revolution was large-sensor cameras making their way to mass market, and this is an effect we’re still seeing today. Fundametally it changed the way people wanted their footage to look.

One unexpected outcome of this, as Philip points out, is that being able to shoot footage to a professional standard is less about having the heart and more about having the skill.

Which circles back, rather neatly, to the issue of editing. If you want your footage to look good then you need to make sure you have the chops to deliver it, and one of the fastest ways to achieve that is to learn how to edit your own stuff.

Watch our video interview above for more from Philip, and then go back to see part one and part two of the series.